Koldinghus castle

Koldinghus is the royal castle situated in the middle of the little town of Kolding, pretty much in the middle of Denmark.

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Standing at the place already since the 13th century, it has changed its appearance several times due to numerous reconstructions. In the middle of the 16th century, the castle was rebuilt in Renaissance style. The “Giant tower” was added at that time. The castle was almost destroyed by the fire during the Napoleonic wars, in 1808, when the Spanish soldiers accidentally burned it down during their stay. It took a long time to restore it – the works were finished by 1991 with a wonderful combination of the old and new architectural elements mixed together in the interiors.

img15The former chapel restored in a rather modern way with the lamp posts symbolising the pillars and the ceiling lights the arches that used to be.

img16Modern solution for the concert hall.

Take plenty of time as there are many hidden rooms in the castle which you may not even find or be aware of, as there is the lack of signs on the doors. I would encourage you to try to open all the doors that look tempting and go up the stairs, as perhaps you will discover something wonderful or reach the top of the castle tower with the magnificent view!
One of the rooms is hiding a selection of historic wardrobes which can be tried on as well – great for the kids!

The permanent exhibition is nice, although feels a little bit dated.

However, the restored part is likely to take your breath away! The architects have left the ruins visible, while building the new part around and on top of it, using the modern architectural elements. The twisted iron staircase takes you up on different levels, at times quite hanging in the air, creating a slightly eerie feeling. The slightly stomach-turning experience is well worth it!

The restored part houses temporary exhibitions. Currently for last few days, until the 22nd October, there is the chance to see “Beyond Icons” – the exhibition celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Kolding´s Design School – the University where I was teaching my glove making workshop. On display are the works of the graduates and looking at other than only the iconic pieces of Danish design.

After this the new exhibition will be by the talented Finnish jewellery designer Mari Keto, who creates magical artefacts worth examining closer.
Next year the castle will be celebrating 750th anniversary with a very big exhibition, including the selection of the crown jewels!

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Riina O in Denmark

Riina O in Copenhagen trial7

Riina O was invited to Denmark to run the glove making workshop at Kolding Design Institute for the Fashion and Accessories MA students.
What a lovely dedicated bunch they were!

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Within the 5-day practical workshop the students studied about the history of gloves and what an important role they have played throughout the ages. They got to practice hand stitching on leather and learned to work with a pattern adjusting it to their own hand size. The students mastered the skill of hand stitching by making a trial glove – essential to see the fitting before making the final pair of gloves, involving their creativity and imagination.

Spreading the skills, the craft of hand making gloves will go on…
Riina & students

Karlśtejn Wine Harvest Festival

Last weekend – now seeming like so long time ago – we were in the Czech Republic, and not only just Prague… As the mid-autumn was approaching (or was it still just the end of the Indian Summer?), the Czechs were celebrating the grape harvest festival and my good friend from Prague invited us to get out of town to the Karlśtejn castle wine festival! Sounded perfect and together with the weather cooperation, it really was!

We did not just get out of town – it´s worth mentioning WHAT we got out on – the very old steam train from 1946, that is.

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On Saturday, 30th of September, the perfect sunny weather as if wanted to wish farewell to the Summer.
The annual wine festival celebrates the medieval heritage. On the way to the castle, there were plenty of opportunities to try the freshly fermented wine or the local Czech Riesling, as well as enjoy the specialities of the local kitchen and indulge in the cultural program of historical dances, fakirs, fencers and court magicians. The highlight of the day was the medieval parade in stylized costumes when people re-enacted the historic scenes of the Holy Roman Emperor and Czech King Karel IV and his entourage riding from the Karlśtejn vineyards through the village on their way to the castle.
The visitors are encouraged to come in the period costumes. This is an authentic festival aimed at the mainly local crowd, with many czechs, but not so many foreign tourists around.

medieval preformance

The little town of Karlstejn was very crowded indeed. Every second stand selling Burčák at ridiculously low prices. Burčák is a young Czech partially fermented wine. Interesting fact, that according to the law it is only legal to sell Burčák from the beginning of August till the end of November. The legend has it that Burčák will continue to ferment in your stomach, but this is scientifically impossible.

Burcak

Apparently, there are grape harvest festivals all through the month of September and the beginning of October, so worth looking out for it if you are in the region.

view from the castle

The beautiful Karlśtejn Castle originates from the mid-14th Century. Founded by the King of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV, it was his private residence and the safe place for keeping the royal treasures and the Imperial Crown Jewels.
The castle has been rebuilt repeatedly afterwards, in 15th, 17th century, as well as the end of the 19th century, when it gained the current appearance. The monumental Great Tower is in the centre of the fortifications.

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It is worth visiting with or without the wine festival!

Here We Are!

Burberry continues the tradition of the open house they´ve been having every season since last September. This time they moved from the Makers House to the semi-refurbished building of Old Sessions House, just outside the Farringdon Station in Clerkenwell. The prominent landmark of the 18th century, the former courthouse-turned-restaurant and members´ club rarely opens its doors to the public. It is currently in the midst of transformation.

This time the brand´s new collection is embraced by the vast photography exhibition depicting the true quintessence of the British life and character.
‘Here We Are’ brings together the work of over 30 of the 20th century’s most celebrated social and documentary photographers. The list includes the well-known names, such as Shirley Baker and Ken Russell, Karen Knorr capturing Belgravia in 1979, Charlie Phillips showing around in his local Notting Hill neighbourhood, Brian Griffin´s unconventional way of portraying the British businessmen, Burberry´s latest collaborator´s Alasdair McLellan´s photography work and many more…

My personal favourite was the photo presentation by the Russian fashion designer and photographer Gosha Rubchinskiy of models styled in Burberry´s latest collection.

The exhibition is stretched over three floors winding throughout the rooms of Old Sessions House, Burberry´s new show venue. “Here We Are” is divided into themes which reflect different aspects of the British way of life. The semi-renovated building was quite a sight in itself.

And of course, there are clothes! You can´t forget that Burberry is a very British fashion brand, creating the clothes these everyday moments can be captured in. The main trends include red military-inspired jackets(I used to have one of these a few years ago made by an English young designer with crazy leather sleeves), the long black military-inspired woollen coat which I completely fell in love with, a lot of tartan fabric, large selection of see-throughs, multiple versions of knitwear and long woollen socks.

However, note that the models and mortals pictured on the social photography are not (always) wearing Burberry.

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The exhibition is free and open till 1st of October 2017.

 

LFW Roberta Einer California Dreaming

Central Saint Martins´ old headquarters building got revamped for Roberta Einer´s newest collection showcase. For her SS18 preview, it was completely Californiacated with the help of palm trees, cushions, warm lighting and some thematic music on the background.

Just as you would expect, the inspiration for this collection derives from California – its surf and skate culture in the 1970-80s, the era of punchy slogans and colourful graphic design.
Roberta´s bright and shimmering work is in tune with her signature style, loved by many. The maximalist luxury ready-to-wear designer finds her influence in the works of Joseph Szabo, Hugh Holland and Jay Adams – it is the never-ending summer and the pools are drained for showing off the skating skills. When the youth rules and the only thing matters is to be cool.
Raymond Pettibon´s posters speak the same language as the slogans on the oversized jackets, slip dresses and the accessories. Childlike illustrations are mixed with the punk rock aesthetic.

As ever, there are the oversized, richly embellished bomber jackets, little sassy skirts draped to glamorous effect, baggy T-shirts accentuate the crop tops crocheted of bugle beads, contrasted with wide-leg palazzo trousers and embroidered slip dresses. Asymmetry as the trend of the season can be noted. Motif-wise it is all about the waves and the palm trees.

The texture is always the key in Roberta´s work, ranging from the well-known bead embroidery to the layers of chiffon, Swarovski crystal embellishments and leather applique.
The designer once again teams up with Swarovski to show off her textile ingenuity. The new collaboration is with Vans on shoes, with sneakers embroidered in bead patterns and slogans.

The models look relaxed and at ease in these clothes. The laid-back atmosphere oozes girl-power and the team spirit.

The Size Doesn’t Matter

You may think this post is about fashion and celebrating all human sizes, not just XS size models – on the contrary, this is the name of Estonian Design exhibition, pointing out that despite its tiny size, the country has a rather high density of talented designers.

As part of London Design Festival, 16-24th of September, Estonian Design House is displaying a large selection of the newest design objects, blending the innovation, latest technologies and solutions of the day with the rich visual heritage.

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The exhibition displays home furnishing products: textiles, furniture, lighting, ceramics, glass and a small selection of apparel, shoes and accessories of high quality and made using natural materials. Nearly 50 designers are represented. The crisp collection is characteristic of the Nordic country – characterised by a minimalist style, natural materials, ingenious solutions and humour.

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At the back of the shop, it is possible to purchase some of the quirky masterpieces.

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In addition to the physical design items, the event is screening the newest Estonian Fashion Film “Northern Spirit” – setting the mood and introducing the work of 10 fashion designers, and an additional array of accessory designers.

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Riina O gloves are also featured in some of the video clips.

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OXO Tower Wharf hosts a number of other exhibitions and events over the weekend, so it is well worth heading down there over the weekend to explore more!

The Estonian Design exhibition, along with the pop-up shop is open every day until the 24th September, 11-6 pm.

Riina O pop-up in Northampton

Last weekend, on the 9th September Riina O was invited to Northampton to do a pop-up during the Heritage Open Day at the National Leather Collection.

Northampton is regarded as the heart of the UK’s leather and footwear industry. It is a home to the only university offering a Leather Technology course in English.
The town also has an exciting footwear museum, full of gorgeous historic shoes.

The National Leather Collection was founded as the Museum of Leather Craft in London 1946. Supported by the London Livery Companies, the museum takes care for the largest collection of items and information relating to Leather in the world. Recently moved to Northampton, the museum will open to the public in a few months – The Open Day was a chance to offer a sneak peek into their magical universe of leathercrafts with artefacts from prehistoric archaeology to 20th-century warfare.

The National Leather Collection is aiming to house the creative hub with the facilities to run workshops. It would be wonderful to have one of our glove making workshops there one day…

Riina O stand. image by Patrick Anthonisz

Have a first peek at our new collection “The Flowers of Evil” featuring a collaboration with a talented illustrator Natali Pahapill, resulting in a luxurious silk scarf and another collaboration with a skilful hand embroiderer Amy Burt.

image by Patrick Anthonisz

Can you recognise the plants depicted on the gloves?

Please comment if you can!