Here We Are!

Burberry continues the tradition of the open house they´ve been having every season since last September. This time they moved from the Makers House to the semi-refurbished building of Old Sessions House, just outside the Farringdon Station in Clerkenwell. The prominent landmark of the 18th century, the former courthouse-turned-restaurant and members´ club rarely opens its doors to the public. It is currently in the midst of transformation.

This time the brand´s new collection is embraced by the vast photography exhibition depicting the true quintessence of the British life and character.
‘Here We Are’ brings together the work of over 30 of the 20th century’s most celebrated social and documentary photographers. The list includes the well-known names, such as Shirley Baker and Ken Russell, Karen Knorr capturing Belgravia in 1979, Charlie Phillips showing around in his local Notting Hill neighbourhood, Brian Griffin´s unconventional way of portraying the British businessmen, Burberry´s latest collaborator´s Alasdair McLellan´s photography work and many more…

My personal favourite was the photo presentation by the Russian fashion designer and photographer Gosha Rubchinskiy of models styled in Burberry´s latest collection.

The exhibition is stretched over three floors winding throughout the rooms of Old Sessions House, Burberry´s new show venue. “Here We Are” is divided into themes which reflect different aspects of the British way of life. The semi-renovated building was quite a sight in itself.

And of course, there are clothes! You can´t forget that Burberry is a very British fashion brand, creating the clothes these everyday moments can be captured in. The main trends include red military-inspired jackets(I used to have one of these a few years ago made by an English young designer with crazy leather sleeves), the long black military-inspired woollen coat which I completely fell in love with, a lot of tartan fabric, large selection of see-throughs, multiple versions of knitwear and long woollen socks.

However, note that the models and mortals pictured on the social photography are not (always) wearing Burberry.

7

The exhibition is free and open till 1st of October 2017.

 

Advertisements

The Size Doesn’t Matter

You may think this post is about fashion and celebrating all human sizes, not just XS size models – on the contrary, this is the name of Estonian Design exhibition, pointing out that despite its tiny size, the country has a rather high density of talented designers.

As part of London Design Festival, 16-24th of September, Estonian Design House is displaying a large selection of the newest design objects, blending the innovation, latest technologies and solutions of the day with the rich visual heritage.

5

The exhibition displays home furnishing products: textiles, furniture, lighting, ceramics, glass and a small selection of apparel, shoes and accessories of high quality and made using natural materials. Nearly 50 designers are represented. The crisp collection is characteristic of the Nordic country – characterised by a minimalist style, natural materials, ingenious solutions and humour.

2

At the back of the shop, it is possible to purchase some of the quirky masterpieces.

4

In addition to the physical design items, the event is screening the newest Estonian Fashion Film “Northern Spirit” – setting the mood and introducing the work of 10 fashion designers, and an additional array of accessory designers.

3

Riina O gloves are also featured in some of the video clips.

northern spirit screenshot1

OXO Tower Wharf hosts a number of other exhibitions and events over the weekend, so it is well worth heading down there over the weekend to explore more!

The Estonian Design exhibition, along with the pop-up shop is open every day until the 24th September, 11-6 pm.

The Multi Style World of Anna Sui

American fashion designer Anna Sui is revealing her world of decades-long work and the inspiration behind it in her retrospective exhibition at London Fashion and Textile Museum.

2017-08-27 12.24.10

The retrospective exhibition of a truly American signature fashion designer bedazzled with its multiplicity of subcultural styles. Her inherent style grasps rock-n-roll romanticism mixed with pop/sub culture and with a touch of Bohemian chic.
Anna knew already as a 4-year old kid that she wanted to become a fashion designer and everything she did since then was leading her to the goal.
The exhibition displays her different collections, from the first catwalk show to the present day, each representing a certain ever changing style, her research and inspiration, the collaborations with other creatives and much more.
2017-08-27 12.33.50
Her “archetypes” range from surfers and school girls to hippies, mods and punks, nomads and rock stars, creating a different story with each collection. The right word to use to describe her style would be eclectic. As well as playful and fun – not something to be taken too seriously. Some of her whimsical accessories feature dog head turbans and gingerbread handbags, for example.
In addition to the pop culture, the strong influence in her work is a nomad, travelling to all the corners of the world. The indigenous and national dress is a great source of her interest, as well as her references to global cultures.
The amount of her research into vintage fashion and popular culture is impressive. Anna Sui blends her sources of inspiration from photography, art, graphic design, music and subculture styles, creating her own interpretation of the current moment by using the unfamiliar perspective on familiar things. Each of her outfits creates a different “fairy tale” and you can transform yourself through her clothes.
2017-08-27 12.38.51
Anna helped to define the American look in the 1990s. The fashion was infused with the youthful spirit in that era, turning its back to the head-to-toe high-end designer brands that dominated in the 1980s. Anna´s retrospective work from the 90s reinvents itself in the current day fashion with the revival of the main style elements.

The exhibition is open till 1.st October 2017.

Wellcome Collection

One of my favourite places in London is the Wellcome Collection with its curiosity cabinets.

Located at 183 Euston Road, London, it explores the connections between medicine, life and art in the past, present and future. The venue hosts a museum with permanent and temporary exhibitions, the world-renowned Wellcome Library, the conference centre, a café with some great food and a very cool shop where it is possible to find many unusual gifts.

The Wellcome collection space was opened in 2007, but its story goes a lot further back to its founder Sir Henry Wellcome (1853-1936). Pharmacist, entrepreneur, philanthropist and collector, he made his fame and fortune by his extensive work in the pharmaceutical business. Being one of the first ones to introduce the medicine in the form of a tablet, Wellcome-funded scientists developed medicines to cure a number of important diseases, from tetanus to diphtheria.
In addition to the pharmaceuticals, Henry Wellcome had a passion for collecting unusual items and curiosities from around the world. His personal collection ranged to over a million of items, stacked away at the warehouse in Willesden. After his death, the Wellcome Foundation was established, which lead to the opening of the Collection over 70 years later.

I would like to specifically concentrate on the “Medicine Man” permanent exhibition, presenting the outright weird items from around the world. The extraordinary objects range from Victorian-era diagnostic dolls to Japanese sex aids, from the samples of tattooed human skin to antique artificial arms and legs.

This is quite a different exhibition to discover in London.

All images by Wellcome Collection / Rama Knight.

I have always been attracted to the mysterious wonders of the world, being captivated rather by the unusual than the well known regular things around us. One of my personal early childhood memories includes the blowfish carcass, from my father´s trips to Africa, displayed in the hallway cabinet. Even now our home is filled with the curiosities from around the world, brought back from my extensive travels. Often these are just random remarkable pieces of nature, such as a piece of bark from an exotic tree, a shell of a specific-looking nut or something more mysterious. If the space allowed, the collection would be a lot wider.
Inspired by the Wellcome collection (and other curiosity cabinets of this kind) I am looking to take this passion of mine further, continuing to collect the unusual items along the way and perhaps sharing the most remarkable finds online.

Burberry´s Makers House – Henry Moore: Inspiration & Process

Burberry continues its tradition of the Makers House, opening the doors of their showroom to public, first run for the in September 2016.

This time Burberry explores the unique collaboration with the Henry Moore Foundation.
Henry Moore (1898–1986) was one of the most important artists and sculptors of the 20th century. He is renowned for his semi-abstract monumental shapes and curves representing the human body. England´s landscape and natural world proved to be his endless sources of inspiration. Some of Moore´s iconic ideas can be traced back to the found objects he collected – pebbles, bones, seashells and pieces of wood formed the “library of natural forms” on the shelves of his studio. Moore would sketch these objects and transform them through the addition of new material.
Being born and later based in Yorkshire – same as Burberry´s trench coat factory and the birthplace of current creative director Christopher Bailey – Moore became a global star in his own lifetime. His work came to symbolise post-war modernism and can be said to have caused a British sculptural renaissance.

2017-02-23-19-39

This exhibition is the celebration of Burberry´s new collection (named innovatively “February 2017” rather than traditionally defined by S/S or A/W seasons, and instantly available in-stores.) alongside the work and creative process of the iconic artist who´s work inspired it. The exhibition looks behind the scenes into Henry Moore´s workshop as well as Burberry´s studios to view the research and creation processes, explaining how the final results were achieved.

The whole showroom is divided into different segments, one corner at the entrance featuring Henry Moore exhibition posters from around the world, spanning 60 years.

The passage to the main showroom is filled with an exhibition of 78 couture capes introduced on the February runway. Inspired by the scale and form of Henry Moore’s elemental sculptures and created using unique constructions and remarkable materials, each design is handmade and available to special order, being a unique collector´s piece. The craftsmanship put into every cape is rather astonishing!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The main hall features the full Burberry collection, shown first during the London Fashion Week, allowing to discover the garments up close. Unfortunately, for purchasing or trying them on you still have to go across Soho to Burberry shop or online right there on your phone.
The collection features deconstructed knitwear, asymmetric lines, a selection of capes, alongside their signature trench coats, ruffled shirt dresses mixed with lace details and strongly featured nautical stripes.

A separate section looks at Burberry´s inspiration room, taking a glimpse into the research, creative techniques and sketches behind the new runway collection.

Similar sneak peek can be taken at Henry Moore´s creative process, exploring the artist´s working methods – drawings, found objects and large-scale sculptures showcase the creative process of one of Britain´s greatest artists.

2017-02-23-20-11
A number of creative workshops are run on the daily basis. There are a few more nooks and corners to discover during your visit.

Runway presentation of the whole collection can be viewed on the way out.

Open daily 10am-9pm until Monday, the 27th of February 2017.
1 Manette Street London, W1D 4AT

Winter Cocktails at Texture – 7SL

texture-collection-low-copy

The icy winter months make many of us crave warm, spice-infused drinks and tasty comfort food. We yearn for dining experiences that fill our tummies with hearty dishes and flush our cheeks with warming cocktails. Icelandic folk are experts on wintery fayre, hence why we decided to nip into the Michelin starred, award-winning Icelandic restaurant and bar, Texture in Marylebone.

Source: Winter Cocktails at Texture – 7SL

Shun the detox and eat cake at the Barbican Conservatory – 7 Star Life

There is a hidden marvel nestled in the middle of London, surrounded by an erratic maze of concrete walls. During the winter months when the sky resembles a dreary grey blanket of clouds, we crave escapism somewhere wild and green – almost jungle like…

Source: Shun the detox and eat cake at the Barbican Conservatory – 7SL

My newest contribution to 7 Star Life magazine